On June 22, 2013, The Shaft officiated over 19 public weddings at the Koban project space, located in a defunct police kiosk next to the Baltimore train station. Couples went through a "Fast Fiances" matchmaking service before going to couples counseling, filling out their blank vow-writing forms, and getting married in a nontraditional commitment ceremony.


Video by Benjamin Andrew

A Wedding Package interrogates the definition of socially engaged art through the literal reenactment of the marriage ceremony. If the value of art hinges upon the ritual courtship of the unknown, A Wedding Package relies upon visitor commitment to establish art’s significance.


Making public what is typically considered a private ceremony, A Wedding Package involves the city of Baltimore in a common, yet de-familiarized social spectacle. The Shaft subjects this most sacred of ceremonies to public scrutiny in front of The Koban, a defunct police substation and impotent symbol of power. A random call for couples to meet and marry in an assembly-line fashion before the architecture of enforcement reproduces the way in which products are mass-produced and consumed in late capitalist culture. This direct action contextualizes the institution of marriage as a fetishized object or absurd cultural fixture divested of its original meaning.


With this Art, I thee wed. 

Photo by ArtChick Photography

Photo by ArtChick Photography
Photo by ArtChick Photography
Photo by ArtChick Photography
Photo by ArtChick Photography
Photo by ArtChick Photography
Photo by ArtChick Photography
Photo by ArtChick Photography
Photo by ArtChick Photography
Photo by ArtChick Photography
Photo by ArtChick Photography
Photo by ArtChick Photography
Photo by ArtChick Photography
Photo by ArtChick Photography
Photo by ArtChick Photography
Photo by ArtChick Photography
Photo by ArtChick Photography